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Activity Blog: Spotsy Farmers Market

Posted by on April 19, 2014

As the weather finally starts getting warmer, one of my favorite things about spring and summer is finally back; farmers markets. I’ve been able to visit the one located right downtown in Hurkamp park a few times, but that was pretty much all I had been to. Our section in class on supporting local vendors inspired me and so I did some research on what else was out there. Earlier today I went over the the Spotsylvania Farmers Market, which began its official season just last Saturday. I was so impressed with the amount of variety they had, and I only went to one of their three locations! The one I went to was right off the Route 3 and Gordon Rd intersection, where there is a commuter lot where over 42 vendors come from within a 100 mile radius to sell ‘producer- only goods’ which means their products are grown or made by the vendors selling them.

Photo by: Claire McCartney

Photo by: Claire McCartney

I really recommend checking out their website, it has all the information you need for farmers markets in the King George, Spotsylvania, and Fredericksburg area. It even has a great graph of whats in season (located as a separate tab) so that you can make an informed decision about what produce to buy. There was a great deal of produce, but also baked goods, meat and dairy, and specialty items like tea and spices. One of the things we mentioned in class is the struggle when buying locally vs buying organically, and which is better? Yes, buying organically will probably be cheaper than locally, but what you’re not paying directly for are the transportation costs and the thousands of miles your organic food has to travel. Local markets like this one are a much smaller range, and from what I saw, do an amazing job at promoting sustainable and eco-friendly products.

(Papa Weaver Products) Photo by: Claire McCartney

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Papa Weaver Products: No antibiotics, hormones, nitrates, MSG, preservatives, or gluten)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Glenburnie Farm Produce Co: Chemical Free)

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Glenburnie Farm Produce Co: Chemical Free)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Lippert Family Farm: Pasture raised)

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Lippert Family Farm: Pasture raised)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Stallard Road Farm: "Grass finished, not just grass fed")

Photo by: Claire McCartney (Stallard Road Farm: “Grass finished, not just grass fed”)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also went over and talked to the Virginia Cooperative Extension booth, and they were very informative and had so much information. Based from Virginia Tech, they are an organization who’s goal is to spread information about gardening and all the factors that come with it. They had brochures for soil sampling, BMP’s (best management practices), pest control, and pretty much anything you would need to know. If anyone has an interest in starting a garden (which I know I now do) they are a great resource!

Photo by: Claire McCartney

Photo by: Claire McCartney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I really recommend visiting any Saturday you can from 8am – 1pm, I’m definitely going back and checking out other locations. They also have booths that deal with agri-tourism and promoting education for kids at a young age about agriculture. And if you get the chance, visit the booth from Fieldcrest Farm, because they have some of the best zuchinni bread I’ve ever had.

3 Responses to Activity Blog: Spotsy Farmers Market

  1. Dr. Szulczewski

    I love the fact that the Va Extension Service sets up a table there- what a great way to get all their information out to interested people. You can also find good relevant info at other state’s extension service websites as well.

  2. tfenn

    Farmer’s Markets really are great ways to act locally. It’s also a good way to help small farmers. My favorite thing about farmer’s markets is that it showcases all the local produce and cuisine. Supermarkets can have a wider selection, but they’re so full of junk that it’s almost tasteless.

  3. jdeis

    I really like the first website link that you posted and the graph you referenced in particular. I’m a bit ashamed to admit that I only guestimated the growing seasons for most crops, and did so incorrectly for many of them. I had no idea that strawberry’s were in season for such a short time; Secobeck has been serving them practically year round. Your second resource, to the Virginia Cooperative Extension is one that I’ve used before and found incredibly helpful. I linked the specific document I used in a comment to Dillon’s post, but they have been very helpful in planning my planting and harvesting seasons.

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